Donor Sperm Program

Donor sperm allows single women or same-sex couples the opportunity to conceive a child. Donor sperm is also used by couples when the spouse/partner has no sperm or very poor sperm (azoospermia, oligospermia, or other factors). Donor sperm can also be used if the male partner has an inherited genetic condition.

Donor sperm has been frozen for later use since the 1970s, and countless babies have been born as a result of using donor sperm. It is one of the most common fertility treatment options available.

Conceptions offers several opportunities to use Donor Sperm for these situations:

  • Donor Sperm IUI CyclesIUI with donor sperm can be performed under certain conditions (completed physical workup, psych clearance per FDA guidelines, communicable disease screening, physician approval)
  • Donor Sperm IVF CyclesIVF with donor sperm can be performed under most conditions (completed physical workup, psych clearance per FDA guidelines, communicable disease screening, physician approval)
  • Donor Sperm for Embryo FreezingEmbryos can be created using donor sperm with plans for longer-term storage, often in the case of a cancer diagnosis, delayed conception due to going back to school, etc.

Anonymous vs. Known Donor

Most sperm banks offer a variety of options for sperm providers based on physical appearance, personality traits, medical history, education, and other factors. Most banks provide “Anonymous” sperm samples with general information given about the donor. Some banks provide “open” contact with donor. Sperm banks have already completed the federally-mandated 6 month quarantine period, and they will have sperm that is immediately available for you to purchase.

The other option is to use a “Known Donor,” or someone you already know who is willing to provide sperm. Using a Known Donor has different federal and legal requirements. If the Known Donor is not someone that you are sexually intimate with, he must go through the complete FDA-mandated federal testing, and then his sperm must be quarantined for a period of 6 months. We can recommend an off-site, federally-approved center for cryopreserving the sperm. The donor will then repeat his testing to confirm that his infectious disease screening is still negative prior to you using that sperm. Legal agreements are also required for using a Known Donor to protect all parties involved.

Donor Sperm Banks

Conceptions only accepts donor sperm from reputable, FDA-regulated sperm banks.

Conceptions has partnered with Seattle Sperm Bank to provide available ON-SITE donor sperm with no shipping costs associated. Please see the available donors at: https://conceptions.seattlespermbank.com/

Conceptions & Seattle Sperm Bank

Seattle Sperm Bank

Conceptions Reproductive Associates of Colorado collaborates with Seattle Sperm Bank (SSB) to offer you an extensive inventory of high-quality sperm donors that are already on-site at Conceptions. There is no shipping required, so there are no extra costs to you. Once you make a purchase, Conceptions Reproductive Associates of Colorado lab staff will automatically arrange for your vials to be in the right place, at the right time, and ready for your insemination. Not only does this system save you hundreds of dollars on shipping expenses, it also eliminates the hassle of sending vials across the country and worrying about them arriving on time. All you need to do is select a donor, place your order online, and select your treating physician. The rest is on us.

Other donor sperm banks that Conceptions has approved:

California Cryobank
866-927-9622
11915 La Grange Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Cryogam
800.473.9601
2216 Hoffman Dr. Unit B
Loveland, CO 80538
Fairfax Cryobank
800-338-8407
3015 Willaims Drive, Ste 110
Fairfax, VA 22031

Contact us if your sperm provider is not on this list.

FAQs for Donor Sperm:

What testing is done on the sperm?

Each cryobank has their own specific criteria for sperm donors, but there are some basic federal requirements by the FDA for all sperm donors: donor medical history, relevant social behavior review, physical examination, infectious disease screening (HIV, Hepatitis, Syphilis, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, HTLV, CMV).

Why do I have to have psychological screening done?

The FDA requires that a psychological evaluation be performed on the woman/couple using donor sperm. This meeting is educational in nature and nothing to be overly concerned about.

Can I do a home insemination with donor sperm?

Conceptions does not participate in home insemination with donor sperm. Home inseminations do not use the same blood work and ultrasound monitoring as an office IUI cycle. Often, home inseminations do not use the same health testing, infectious disease screening or psychological counseling that is required by fertility clinics performing in-office IUIs. Home inseminations may not use sterile equipment, and injuries or infections can occur with use of administered sperm.

Can I use someone that I know to provide sperm for me?

Using a “known donor” has different federal and legal requirements. If the Known Donor is not someone that you are sexually intimate with, he must go through the FDA-mandated federal testing, and then the sperm must be quarantined for a period of 6 months. We can recommend an off-site, federally-approved center for cryopreserving the sperm. The donor will then repeat his testing to confirm that his infectious disease screening is still negative prior to you using that sperm. Legal agreements are also required for using a known donor to protect all parties involved.

What is CMV?

CMV is short for Cytomegalovirus, a common herpes-family virus which usually presents with fatigue, fever, sore throat, and muscle aches. CMV is related to the viruses that can cause chickenpox, mononucleosis, and herpes simplex. CMV is transmitted through body fluids like saliva, blood, urine, tears, and semen/vaginal fluids. According to the CDC, 50% of adults have been exposed to CMV by age 40. Because it presents like a common cold, people are not even aware that they have been exposed to this specific virus. Healthy individuals rare require medical treatment. Once you have been exposed to CMV, you carry the virus for life and can, therefore, transmit the virus, even if you are no longer ill.

What does CMV have to do with donor sperm?

CMV status is important in selecting donor sperm because a CMV positive sperm sample can transmit the virus to a woman if she has not been previously exposed (CMV negative). While rare, this can lead to a CMV infection in a developing baby. A baby born with CMV is at risk for significant health concerns, including hearing loss, vision loss, developmental delays, microcephaly, or seizures.

If you are CMV positive, you can choose either CMV positive or CMV negative sperm without concern for risk to a child.

Is my child at risk if I am CMV positive?

If you are CMV positive, you carry the antibodies for CMV and are not likely to develop a CMV infection. Therefore, there should not be risk to a developing child.

When do I order sperm? What kind of sperm prep should I get? How many vials do I need?

Please order your sperm AFTER you have been told to do so by your nurse (after CMV and other test results are confirmed). You nurse can guide you regarding which CMV status you should order. Your nurse can also help you coordinate shipping of sperm to Conceptions when approved.

Sperm is prepared as ICI, IUI, or even "ART" type based on intended use. Conceptions can use ANY preparation type, and will further prepare your sample as needed. Choose your donor based on the qualities you are looking for in the donor, rather than the preparation type.

Your nurse will usually recommend that you order 2 vials of your intended donor, so there is a backup.